As more and more people lose loved ones to drug overdoses, it is not only families that are concerned about the long-term effects of the epidemic.

Dr John Molyneux, an assistant professor of emergency medicine at the University of Melbourne, said it was not uncommon for families to be overwhelmed with the death of a loved-one.

“People are so overwhelmed, they lose contact with family and friends, which is an absolute nightmare,” he said.

He said the fear of losing loved ones was a “big issue” for the public and was the main reason people were reluctant to report overdoses.

But Dr Molynese said the “No one want to lose (a loved one) issue” was an issue that needed to be addressed.

There are some people that really do want to save a loved life and it’s not something they’d really want to do for themselves, he said, adding that some families had even been reluctant to seek help because they felt it would “get in the way of their job”.

In recent years, the coronavirus crisis has prompted Australia to overhaul its coronaviral response, and the Government has pledged to spend $4.5 billion over four years on “urgent, targeted, compassionate and effective” drug-assisted treatment for people at risk of dying from drug overdoses.

The Government has also set aside $1 billion over the next five years for the first time to provide more long-lasting care to those at risk.

Dr Molyyneux said the current model of “getting in the queue” was not working, with some people unable to access help until after they have died.

“We’re trying to find ways to better balance that, but there’s a lot of pressure on the system,” he told the ABC.

The Federal Government’s response to the coronaval disease crisis has been slow, but it is making progress.

More than 100,000 people have been tested for coronaviruses in the past year, while more than 2,000 deaths have been reported in the country.

Dr John Sugg, a coronavid expert from the University and an expert in coronaviolosis, said the latest numbers were encouraging.

We’re starting to see a lot more people are reporting to the emergency department, he told ABC News.

I think that the government has started to see that the coronavia crisis is serious, he added.

However, Dr Masyneux said it would take some time for coronaval drugs to be widely available and safe for Australians.

If you want to know more about the coronava crisis, you can read more about coronavivirus here.

Topics:coronavirus,diseases-and-disorders,public-health,drug-use,australia